Book Review: Riddle of the Exodus

Posted: April 6, 2013 in Archaeology, History

BookReview, Long Updated Review of James D. Long, Riddle of the Exodus:

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Comments
  1. truthceeker says:

    There are truly too many scholars running off of ataboys and other acknowlegments from other “scholars” without any consideration of their primary source material.

    Thank you sir for you continued contribution to conservative scholarship. 🙂 Peace continue to be with you and yours.

  2. John hext-fremlin says:

    Verne you talk about the “Three age System” . Stone Bronze Iron and steel working were available immediately after the flood notably 2347 and 2295 BC so would have needed stone and flint tools to aid them in mining for metals.

    Indeed Palaeolithic Neolithic/Bronze/Iron and steel industries people have been found to co-exist simultaneously on the River Lena not far from where the arc landed. I refrain from using the evoloutionary term “Mesolithic” as this still applies in my view to in my view huntergatherers of the end Palaeolithic

    I still hold with Ussher’s chronology and on that issue I’d like to mention the Amesbury Archer found buried with flint arrowheads and a copper dagger conventionally dated to 2300 BC which translates to Ussher’s timeline of about 1960 BC as far as Britain is concerned.

    Again Neolithic culture is dated in Britain by conventional archaeologists to 4000-3900 BC and on the Ussher timeline = 2295 BC to 2265 BC for the earliest world survey teams.

    How can for example the Amesbury archer be defined as early british bronze age when ownly very rarely are bronze artifacts discovered in burial mounds for instance as the Bronze industry was re-introduced into Britain by Hu Gadarn in 1421/1365 BC.

    Given on Darrell’s and my timeline the ice age ended in 1491 BC and indeed Genesis Veracity the period of the Amesbury archer needs redefining so people who are still largely making stone and flint tools in the so-called early bronze ae are strictly speaking still with in the bounds of the stone age or late Neolithic; so would the term late/Neolithic/early bronze be the correct term for this period; given that eb1 proper was reintroduced much later by Hu G 1421/1365 BC.

    Let me also add that Partholan colonised Ireland in 2035 BC and his team were of Neolithic culture contemporary with the so-called early Bronze age in Britain. Can you comment on this. John

  3. John hext-fremlin says:

    Can you give me a response. John

    On Sun, Jul 20, 2014 at 3:31 PM, John hext-fremlin wrote:

    > Verne you talk about the “Three age System” . Stone Bronze Iron and steel > working were available immediately after the flood notably 2347 and 2295 BC > so would have needed stone and flint tools to aid them in mining for metals. > > Indeed Palaeolithic Neolithic/Bronze/Iron and steel industries people have > been found to co-exist simultaneously on the River Lena not far from where > the arc landed. I refrain from using the evoloutionary term “Mesolithic” as > this still applies in my view to in my view huntergatherers of the end > Palaeolithic > > I still hold with Ussher’s chronology and on that issue I’d like to > mention the Amesbury Archer found buried with flint arrowheads and a copper > dagger conventionally dated to 2300 BC which translates to Ussher’s > timeline of about 1960 BC as far as Britain is concerned. > > Again Neolithic culture is dated in Britain by conventional archaeologists > to 4000-3900 BC and on the Ussher timeline = 2295 BC to 2265 BC for the > earliest world survey teams. > > How can for example the Amesbury archer be defined as early british bronze > age when ownly very rarely are bronze artifacts discovered in burial mounds > for instance as the Bronze industry was re-introduced into Britain by Hu > Gadarn in 1421/1365 BC. > > Given on Darrell’s and my timeline the ice age ended in 1491 BC and indeed > Genesis Veracity the period of the Amesbury archer needs redefining so > people who are still largely making stone and flint tools in the so-called > early bronze ae are strictly speaking still with in the bounds of the stone > age or late Neolithic; so would the term late/Neolithic/early bronze be the > correct term for this period; given that eb1 proper was reintroduced much > later by Hu G 1421/1365 BC. > > Let me also add that Partholan colonised Ireland in 2035 BC and his team > were of Neolithic culture contemporary with the so-called early Bronze age > in Britain. Can you comment on this. John > >

  4. Kim Purdy says:

    Chronological revisionisn, about the strangest terminology I have heard yet.
    When we are talking about LIFE and revealing TRUTH, there is no place for intellectual croniesism in control of the information we have rights to as humans.
    Making points about who said something first, is simply meaningless,
    I don’t think he is ‘not playing friendly’, by not mentioning colleagues, but I also think he may have, an the author of this ditty, is the one not playing friendly?

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